Water Safety Guide

As the days become longer and the temperature’s rise, so will the urge to jump into a pool or the ocean. A quick cool off is all some people need to make it through the hot summer months and we totally get it. Just remember to practice safety in and around the water to avoid any serious injuries.

Some things to always remember;

Practice the buddy system when going to the beach or when you’re out by the pool, this will avoid any unexpected accidents

Always watch over small children and explain the importance of wearing life-saving gear

Protect your skin by wearing bathing suits made of rash guard or apply sunscreen every few hours

Never use glassware to serve food or drinks especially on a pool deck

Check batteries on door alarms that lead out to your pool or the latch to the pool fence to ensure all safety measures are up and running.

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How to Save and Make Money During COVID-19

Thousands of new job opportunities have come from the Covid-19 pandemic, ranging from the medical field to your local pizza shop. But during this time there are other ways one can also save some money without leaving their home. We would like to share some opportunities available to you, whether you’re looking to make or save money.

Local grocery stores and restaurants are seeking to hire several employees to fulfill positions immediately, ideal for someone who would like to continue working.

With most things being closed and more time on your hands, save some money by getting a quote on your homeowner’s insurance and allowing us to provide you excellent service at a competitive low rate.

Food banks, churches and local governments have gathered to offer residents help by providing produce bags, financial assistance and telecom support for those who seek therapy or medical advice.

Take this time to “spring clean” and set aside items that you no longer use or need and that are in good condition which can be sold in a yard-sale or online app once the shelter-at-home order is lifted.

If you have any ideas or recommendations on how to save or make money during this time, make sure to share it with us.

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Dog Bite Prevention Week

Today barks the beginning of National Dog Bite Prevention Week in which we aim to educate people with simple ways on avoiding a bad encounter with these furry friends. We all know dogs are loving, loyal, protective animals but they also need to be taken care of and respected. Our main goal is to make sure we can all give some good belly scratches with no rough play necessary.

Here are a few ways to prevent negative encounters:

  • Be respectful of every dog, always ask if you can pet some else’s dog
  • Let a dog sniff you first, it’s their way of ensuring you’re a human who wants to pet them and not a threatening predator
  • Never disturb a dog when they are eating, sleeping, chewing on a toy or nurturing their little ones
  • Keep an eye on small children, teach them proper ways to approach and pet any dog
  • If you notice aggressive behavior, keep your distance
  • Always have your dog on a leash, even if he’s a good boy

If you are the owner, remember to take your furry friend to regular check-ups.

These tips were found on AmericanHumane.org, check them out for more information.

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National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

100-yards, 300 feet or the length of a football field, is the distance one can travel without looking at the road because they were distracted on their cellphone. On a typical day, more than 700 people are critically injured due to distracted driving.

Talking or texting on a phone – even if it’s hands-free – diverts attention away from the road and the potential to save a life.  Many companies have started campaigns asking people to take a pledge and commit to making our roads safer for everyone. We invite you to join us in a commitment to drive with no distractions, because all it takes is 100-yards, 300 feet or the length of a football field.

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Child Safety and Protection Month

November is National Child Safety and Protection month in which awareness is raised for the innocent lives lost to often preventable and unintentional injuries. According to the CDC, an average of 12,175 children die each year from accidents like these. It is important to know that safety starts at home with simple measures that can be taken to reduce the risk of these tragedies.

Some safety tips to remember:

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Keep cleaning supplies, medicines, garden chemicals and toxic substances up high and out of reach
Learn to install and buckle up your child’s car seat properly and adjust straps so that they are placed over their chest
Teach children to not play near or on the street and always ask an adult for help if a toy goes past the driveway
Be aware of bodies of water and enforce safety rules such as no running or playing near the water

Always check on kids, whether they are in their room or crib. It only takes seconds for something to go wrong

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Earthquake Preparedness

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Is your home ready for the next big one?

Although earthquakes are unpredictable and years can go by without feeling one, being ready at all times is a must! Everyone knows to take cover and wait it out, but what do you do once the shaking has stopped, will you be ready? A few very important reminders:

  1. Try to maintain close to a full tank of gas in your car at all times (or in portable containers) as gas stations will not operate after a big earthquake.
  2. Share your phone location with family and/or friends so that in the midst of havoc, you can still find each other.
  3. Along with your first aid kit and back up food supply keep a portable charger that can keep your phone alive a little bit longer to call for help.
  4. Check under your sinks for cracks or leakages to make sure you won’t be leaving the house and coming back to a flooded home.
  5. Be ready for aftershocks! Although checking for damages is important, know that aftershocks are more than certain so be prepared to exit or take cover.

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